Victorian diagnoses – medical complexities and vagueries

Seven medical conditions humourously illustrated. Reproduction of an etching. Credit: Wellcome Collection. CC BY One of the advantages of working on archaeology from the colonial period is that we have historical records that help us to interpret what we're seeing in the bones, teeth and artefacts associated with people. Some of the most useful things for those … Continue reading Victorian diagnoses – medical complexities and vagueries

Fun with archaeological maps!

Today's blog comes from Alana Kelly, one of our archaeological volunteers on site, who more-often-than-not was given the job of mapping in the features we found. Today she tells us all about how our archaeological maps were drawn and why they're important! An important part of any archaeological excavation is recording and mapping. While most … Continue reading Fun with archaeological maps!

Miasmas in Milton – a colony beset by respiratory diseases

'there is always a damp vapour arising [in Tokomairiro], highly prejudicial to the health of the inmates, and especially the children’ Francis MacBean Stewart (1875) Milton in the 1870s was not the healthiest place to be. Dr. Frances MacBean Stewart the local medical officer of Health can be found deploring the high death rates in … Continue reading Miasmas in Milton – a colony beset by respiratory diseases

Our research on show at the NZAA conference

Are you an archaeologist who’ll be at the 2019 NZAA conference on Rakiura this coming week? Find out more about the Southern cemeteries project by chatting to our co-director Dr. Peter Petchey ... or visit our excellent honours student Ruby Parker’s poster to hear about mercury exposure among the miners. Ruby modelling a sneak preview … Continue reading Our research on show at the NZAA conference

Filling in the gaps – Dental care in colonial Milton

Dental care might not have been high on the list of priorities for the first European colonists to New Zealand, but it’s an important aspect of life experience. Gum or tooth infections and loss of teeth can have some serious health implications, and result in pain, changes to diet and need for care. Poor dental … Continue reading Filling in the gaps – Dental care in colonial Milton

Studying smoking in the past

Today's blog post comes from one of our Masters Students, Clare De Joux-Perry, who last year spent some time looking at the teeth of the people of Milton in search of evidence of their smoking habits... Our teeth are the only part of our skeletons that regularly interact with our surrounding environment. Every day they … Continue reading Studying smoking in the past